Subverting Irish university autonomy

University Blog

Over the past three or four years a significant change has been taking place in Irish higher education. Since the publication of the Hunt Report in 2011 (National Strategy for Higher Education), there has been a visible shift of public policy in the direction of a more centralised management of the system. The state now regards it as appropriate to set a national strategic purpose to be reflected in individual institutional plans, and also to manage what has become known as the higher education ‘landscape‘ – the latter being the configuration of the sector and the identity and management of the individual universities and colleges within it.

And now, with remarkably little public attention regarding the implications, the government has announced its intention of introducing in 2014 a new piece of legislation in the form of a Universities (Amendment) Bill, the purpose of which is declared…

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Author: Shane O'Mara

Neuroscientist

One thought on “Subverting Irish university autonomy

  1. And it is worth commenting that the greater the autonomy and freedom of the university, the higher they place on all the international rankings. This is even true of Ireland, where Trinity College Dublin, unusual because of its age and long legal history and standing (consider the letters patent going back over four hundred years alone), has more autonomy than the other Irish universities: it consistently features very highly in the various ranking schemes. The answer: set our universities free! All of them!

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