Suppressing the encoding of new information in memory: a behavioral study derived from principles of hippocampal function.

Some extra thoughts and tags added.

Shane O'Mara

Take-home message: We show here that mixing tasks that involve executive control (the n-back task, requiring continual updating and discarding of information held presently ‘in mind’) inhibits dramatically performance on an explicit memory task (associative memory: face-name pair learning), but not performance on control recognition memory tasks. We therefore provide further behavioural evidence that memory subsystems are dissociable, AND that they can mutually inhibit each other.  [Download the paper]

PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e50814. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0050814. Epub 2013 Jan 16.

Suppressing the encoding of new information in memory: a behavioral study derived from principles of hippocampal function.

Mullally SLO’Mara SM.

Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience and School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. s.mullally@ucl.ac.uk

Cognitive processes do not occur in isolation. Interactions between cognitive processes can be observed as a cost in performance following a switch between tasks, a cost that is…

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Author: Shane O'Mara

Neuroscientist

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