Electroconvulsive shock and transcranial stimulation as torture methods in George Orwell’s 1984

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I first read George Orwell’s 1984 while in hospital for a minor operation in my early teens. It horrified me at the time, and it continues to exert a powerful hold on my imagination. It is justly celebrated as possibly the most important political novel of the 20th Century. 1984 describes a world which appears beyond experience, where the individual is entirely subordinated to the state. This is a world where independence of thought and action (‘thoughtcrimes’) are illegal. Great Britain is renamed as Airstrip One, a province of Oceania (an entity comprising Britain, Ireland, North and South America, southern Africa and the further-flung Anglophone countries of Australia and New Zealand)…

follow this next link for a newer, fuller, up-to-date, and reworked version of this post: ‘George Orwell’s 1984 through a neuroscience lens’.

(All quotations from 1984 are from my 1984 paperback edition by Penguin Books)

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Author: Shane O'Mara

Neuroscientist, Psychologist, Writer

3 thoughts on “Electroconvulsive shock and transcranial stimulation as torture methods in George Orwell’s 1984

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